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Course Description

Despite the universality of death, human responses to it are incredibly varied. Because the significance of death and dying is deeply socially constructed, this course situates biological, medical, and psychological conceptions of death and dying in conversation with the religious and ethical perspectives that have also informed human responses to death and dying in different cultural contexts. This interdisciplinary course—team-taught by a psychologist, a scholar of religion, and two end-of-life care physicians—will facilitate a more informed understanding of death-related cultural practices as well as a more skilled response to death-related decisions that arise in the practice of medicine and in life. Enrollment limited to 20 students in Medical Humanities and graduate Humanities fields. Honors undergraduates and PLMEs may enroll with instructor permission.

Class Announcement

Enrollment limited to 20 students in Medical Humanities and graduate Humanities fields. Honors undergraduates and PLMEs may enroll with instructor permission.